The Core

A unique feature of the IB Diploma is the Core with the three mandatory components - the Extended Essay (EE), Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course, and a programme of extra-curricular experiences called Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) Programme. The core is compulsory and central to the philosophy of the Diploma Programme.

The Core

A unique feature of the IB Diploma is the Core with the three mandatory components - the Extended Essay (EE), Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course, and a programme of extra-curricular experiences called Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) Programme. The core is compulsory and central to the philosophy of the Diploma Programme.

 

 

 

 

The Extended Essay is an in-depth study of a focused topic chosen from the list of approved Diploma Programme subjects – normally one of the student’s six chosen subjects for the IB Diploma. It is intended to promote high-level research and writing skills, intellectual discovery and creativity. It provides students with an opportunity to engage in personal research in a topic of their own choice, under the guidance of a supervisor (a teacher in the school). This leads to a major piece of formally presented, structured writing, in which ideas and findings are communicated in a reasoned and coherent manner, appropriate to the subject chosen. It is recommended that completion of the written essay is followed by a short, concluding interview, or viva voce, with the supervisor. It is defined as an independent, self-directed piece of research concluding with a 4,000 word research essay.

Source: IB Extended Essay Guide 2013

 

 

TOK is a course about critical thinking and inquiring into the process of knowing rather than about learning a specific body of knowledge. It is a core element which all Diploma Programme students undertake and to which all schools are required to devote class time. TOK supports the Diploma Programme subjects in the sense that they reference each other and share some common goals. The TOK course examines how we know what we claim to know. It does this by encouraging students to analyse knowledge claims and explore knowledge questions.

 

While there are arguably many ways of knowing, the TOK course identifies eight specific ways of knowing (WOKs). They are: language, sense perception, emotion, reason, imagination, faith, intuition and memory.

 

Areas of knowledge are specific branches of knowledge, each of which can be seen to have a distinct nature and different methods of gaining knowledge. TOK distinguishes between eight areas of knowledge. They are mathematics, the natural sciences, the human sciences, the arts, history, ethics, religious knowledge systems and indigenous knowledge systems.

Source: IB TOK Guide 2015

 

 

 

 

The St. Olav vgs Policy documents cover the areas of: Academic Honesty, Admissions, Assessment, Language, Special Needs. These correspond to Standards and Practices as outlined and approved by the IBO general policies.

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